My Top Ten Puppet Festival Moments 2014

This past Sunday was my first time attending the Skirball’s annual Puppet Festival, and as soon as I reached the parking lot, it was obvious that everyone in attendance was filled with excitement and anticipation. Moms, dads, friends, and relatives were actively engaged in conversation while their children—many dressed in colorful costumes—were skipping with joy at the thought of seeing the myriad of puppets. Throughout the day, I observed many memorable moments; fortunately, talented photographer Peter Turman was there to capture some of them with his camera. The Puppet Festival was a full day of celebrating families, friends, and puppets! Click through the slideshow below to catch a glimpse of the day as seen through my favorite ten of Peter’s photographs.

1. My day at the Puppet Festival began in the craft room, where toilet paper and paper towel rolls were miraculously transformed into marionettes. The crafting materials afforded adults and children alike with a wide array of puppet possibilities, from a simple snake to a more complex elephant or giraffe. Most of the children designed their own imaginary creatures. The little girl in this photograph used buttons for eyes and an assortment of yarn for colorful hair. It is obvious from her mother’s expression that she is proud of her daughter’s original creation.

1. My day at the Puppet Festival began in the craft room, where toilet paper and paper towel rolls were miraculously transformed into marionettes. The crafting materials afforded adults and children alike with a wide array of puppet possibilities, from a simple snake to a more complex elephant or giraffe. Most of the children designed their own imaginary creatures. The little girl in this photograph used buttons for eyes and an assortment of yarn for colorful hair. It is obvious from her mother’s expression that she is proud of her daughter’s original creation.

2.	These puppets based on Stravinsky's ballet <i>The Firebird</i> were stunning. Their expressive, watercolored faces and colorful, billowing fabric bodies made their larger-than-life presence a true showstopper. I loved seeing the <i>Firebird</i> puppets interact with the children. Kids who were not intimidated by their giant stature would approach the puppets and then run away, giggling as if playing a game of tag.

2. These puppets based on Stravinsky's ballet The Firebird were stunning. Their expressive, watercolored faces and colorful, billowing fabric bodies made their larger-than-life presence a true showstopper. I loved seeing the Firebird puppets interact with the children. Kids who were not intimidated by their giant stature would approach the puppets and then run away, giggling as if playing a game of tag.

3.	Puppet Festival is for families! The event creates lifelong memories of spending time with little ones, listening to music, attending puppet shows, exploring Noah’s Ark, and catching up on the latest exhibitions at the Skirball. I particularly enjoyed watching the children munching on snacks as their faces lit up with awe. I haven’t seen so much kiddy food since grade school. Mini mac and cheese and granola bars for everyone!

3. Puppet Festival is for families! The event creates lifelong memories of spending time with little ones, listening to music, attending puppet shows, exploring Noah’s Ark, and catching up on the latest exhibitions at the Skirball. I particularly enjoyed watching the children munching on snacks as their faces lit up with awe. I haven’t seen so much kiddy food since grade school. Mini mac and cheese and granola bars for everyone!

4.	The expressions on the faces of the children in this photograph are absolutely priceless! There is something about puppets that keeps little ones completely engaged.

4. The expressions on the faces of the children in this photograph are absolutely priceless! There is something about puppets that keeps little ones completely engaged.

5.	The giant bird puppet created by Leslie K. Gray is always a real hit. Although it takes three people to guide the immense creature, the puppet appears to be almost weightless.

5. The giant bird puppet created by Leslie K. Gray is always a real hit. Although it takes three people to guide the immense creature, the puppet appears to be almost weightless.

6.	There’s something on your shoulder! At first I thought it was a parrot, but soon came to realize the object getting all the attention was a small puppet critter. The puppeteer laughed as visitors tried to interact with this strange yet absolutely adorable furry creation. All of the puppeteers at the event were enthusiastic about showing off their puppet friends.

6. There’s something on your shoulder! At first I thought it was a parrot, but soon came to realize the object getting all the attention was a small puppet critter. The puppeteer laughed as visitors tried to interact with this strange yet absolutely adorable furry creation. All of the puppeteers at the event were enthusiastic about showing off their puppet friends.

7.	This puppeteer on stilts, also known as Captain Tall Tale, navigated the Skirball grounds with ease. While his head seemed to reach the clouds, every now and then he would lean over to greet a much smaller visitor.

7. This puppeteer on stilts, also known as Captain Tall Tale, navigated the Skirball grounds with ease. While his head seemed to reach the clouds, every now and then he would lean over to greet a much smaller visitor.

8.	This drummer announced the entrance of the gigantic natural-elements puppets that gathered above the Taper Courtyard. Once they were in place, the puppets swayed to the beat of the drums as the audience joined in with the dance.

8. This drummer announced the entrance of the gigantic natural-elements puppets that gathered above the Taper Courtyard. Once they were in place, the puppets swayed to the beat of the drums as the audience joined in with the dance.

9.	In between shows, Captain Tall Tale and his friends brought out a jump rope. They were immediately swarmed by children who wanted to join in on the fun. This photograph captures a boy who appears to be part kangaroo!

9. In between shows, Captain Tall Tale and his friends brought out a jump rope. They were immediately swarmed by children who wanted to join in on the fun. This photograph captures a boy who appears to be part kangaroo!

10.	As the event neared an end, I looked around the crowd and it was obvious that the joy I had observed throughout the day had not diminished. Parents were still chatting, puppeteers continued to entertain, and children were happily playing. Suddenly, this small <i>Firebird</i> puppet whizzed over the children’s heads after the completion of its final performance. The children chased the puppet, reaching for the sky as if nothing could hold them down. The third annual Skirball Puppet Festival was indeed a day filled with laughter, excitement, and love.

10. As the event neared an end, I looked around the crowd and it was obvious that the joy I had observed throughout the day had not diminished. Parents were still chatting, puppeteers continued to entertain, and children were happily playing. Suddenly, this small Firebird puppet whizzed over the children’s heads after the completion of its final performance. The children chased the puppet, reaching for the sky as if nothing could hold them down. The third annual Skirball Puppet Festival was indeed a day filled with laughter, excitement, and love.

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1. My day at the Puppet Festival began in the craft room, where toilet paper and paper towel rolls were miraculously transformed into marionettes. The crafting materials afforded adults and children alike with a wide array of puppet possibilities, from a simple snake to a more complex elephant or giraffe. Most of the children designed their own imaginary creatures. The little girl in this photograph used buttons for eyes and an assortment of yarn for colorful hair. It is obvious from her mother’s expression that she is proud of her daughter’s original creation.2.	These puppets based on Stravinsky's ballet The Firebird were stunning. Their expressive, watercolored faces and colorful, billowing fabric bodies made their larger-than-life presence a true showstopper. I loved seeing the Firebird puppets interact with the children. Kids who were not intimidated by their giant stature would approach the puppets and then run away, giggling as if playing a game of tag.3.	Puppet Festival is for families! The event creates lifelong memories of spending time with little ones, listening to music, attending puppet shows, exploring Noah’s Ark, and catching up on the latest exhibitions at the Skirball. I particularly enjoyed watching the children munching on snacks as their faces lit up with awe. I haven’t seen so much kiddy food since grade school. Mini mac and cheese and granola bars for everyone!4.	The expressions on the faces of the children in this photograph are absolutely priceless! There is something about puppets that keeps little ones completely engaged.5.	The giant bird puppet created by Leslie K. Gray is always a real hit. Although it takes three people to guide the immense creature, the puppet appears to be almost weightless.6.	There’s something on your shoulder! At first I thought it was a parrot, but soon came to realize the object getting all the attention was a small puppet critter. The puppeteer laughed as visitors tried to interact with this strange yet absolutely adorable furry creation. All of the puppeteers at the event were enthusiastic about showing off their puppet friends.7.	This puppeteer on stilts, also known as Captain Tall Tale, navigated the Skirball grounds with ease. While his head seemed to reach the clouds, every now and then he would lean over to greet a much smaller visitor.8.	This drummer announced the entrance of the gigantic natural-elements puppets that gathered above the Taper Courtyard. Once they were in place, the puppets swayed to the beat of the drums as the audience joined in with the dance.9.	In between shows, Captain Tall Tale and his friends brought out a jump rope. They were immediately swarmed by children who wanted to join in on the fun. This photograph captures a boy who appears to be part kangaroo!.

All photos by Peter Turman

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Love Letters to Gary Baseman

Skirball_Gary Baseman - The Door Is Always Open - Skirball Cultural CenteWhile it is quite difficult for all of us here at the Skirball to close the door, literally and figuratively, on the exhibition Gary Baseman: The Door Is Always Open, this Sunday will be the last day it will be on view in our gallery.

Over the past four months, it has been a joy to have one more whimsical place within the Skirball to welcome our visitors and encourage them to let their imaginations run wild. And it is no small perk that the artist is local. Gary Baseman’s regular presence in the gallery made for a unique experience and everyone from our two-year-old guests to the security staff has been won over by his playfulness and his talent. PicMonkey CollageVisitors did not waste any chance to interact with Gary, whether face to face, or via the multiple options made available throughout the exhibition. I thought I’d take this chance to share a few that came across my desk.

Upon admission, visitors were offered a postcard to fill out and drop in Gary’s mailbox at the “front door” to the exhibition. The Skirball collected them and, playing mailman, is delivering them to the artist himself. This is just a small sample (click on the images to get a closer look):hotchachacha postcardtoby postcard collagebuckingham warrior postcard collage
In Gary Baseman’s studio space at the Skirball, sketchbooks were left out for visitors to unlock their creativity, show their artistic talents, and share their love for Gary. Here are a few examples I found (click on the images to get a closer look):Sketchbook Collage

We also received many pictures of people posing in the exhibition on social media with the hashtag #basemanshome Continue reading

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Sunset Concerts Math

Sunset Concerts math - titleSunset Concerts Math - equation 1Sunset Concerts Math - equation 2Sunset Concerts Math - equation 3Thank you, Erik Shveima, for sharing your “Sunset Concerts Math” with us. We hope our SkirBlog readers come see for yourselves how these equations add up. Click here for tips on how to make Sunset Concerts a great night out! And we hope to see you tonight for Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars!

Erik Shveima is a Los Angeles–based artist with a fondness for illustrated blogs, so much so that he is responsible for two: Mixed Media Daily and, most recently, Or Best Offer.

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Schoolhouse Rock Turns the Big 4-0

This Schoolhouse Rock film “Preamble” makes viewing the Constitution in Creating the United States
that much more meaningful and fun.

The suite of exhibitions and programs we’re currently presenting at the Skirball under the thematic umbrella Democracy Matters has gotten me thinking about the way I learned some of the fundamentals of American history and government as a kid in the 1970s.

Growing up in San Diego, I was light years away from Washington D.C. and all those historic sites of colonial wars and document signings—and from the key museums and libraries that house the most noteworthy foundational documents. Instead I learned the basics of American history primarily from a series of short animated music videos that aired as interstitial programs on ABC: Schoolhouse Rock (which turns forty today according to the Washington Post and NPR)!

Come now, all you forty-somethings out there. Didn’t many of you, too, learn the Preamble to the Constitution from a Schoolhouse Rock film with an unbelievably catchy tune sung by Lynn Ahrens… Continue reading

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Hanukkah Family Festival through a Photographer’s Lens

Come rain, come shine, the Skirball’s annual Hanukkah family festival always draws a crowd of diverse generations, backgrounds, and smiles. Photographer and first-time festival attendee BeBe Jacobs was impressed with this year’s Hanukkah festival, Americana Hanukkah, which took inspiration from our campus-wide “Democracy Matters” initiative to celebrate the Jewish holiday. “No matter what activity [people] were doing,” she told me, as we looked over the images she shot that day, “the fact that families were spending time together made all the difference.”

For both of us, the Hanukkah festival not only brought families together but also brought out creativity that visitors did not realize they had. There was plenty to do all day, like watch Marcus Shelby and his quintet perform beautiful freedom songs… or hear Story Pirates act out original Hanukkah tales on stage… or join a tour focusing on the Skirball’s collection of Hanukkah lamps (the last couple of these Lights of Hanukkah Family Tours take place today and tomorrow, so be sure to swing by this weekend). But it was at the hands-on art workshops where people got a chance to create something themselves.

Here, BeBe shares ten of her favorite photos from that fun-filled day with reflections on the people and moments that made them so special.

BeBe was amazed at how each visitor could create beautiful art pieces out of plain materials. Here, a visitor displays a menorah he made out of plastic tubes, colorful tape, and stickers.

BeBe was amazed at how each visitor could create beautiful art pieces out of plain materials. Here, a young visitor displays a menorah he made out of plastic tubes, colorful tape, and stickers.

BeBe found this young girl patiently waiting as her brother worked on an art project of his own. BeBe placed a tiny menorah on the glue stick in front of the girl. Immediately she looked down and started to blow out the “candles” in the menorah.

This young girl patiently waited as her brother finished his art project. In a moment of silliness, Bebe placed a tiny menorah on the glue stick in front of the girl. Immediately she looked down and started to blow out the “candles”.

According to BeBe, this young visitor was very proud of the Hanukkah pin she crafted. Her glee shines through in this photo!

This young visitor was very proud of the Hanukkah pin she crafted. The glee that shines through in this photo makes it an easy favorite!

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Two Benjamins

Military uniform (jacket, epaulets, waistcoat, breeches, tricorn hat, and wig) and leather satchel of Jonathan Bancroft of Massachusetts, 1777-ca. 1789. From the collection of Dr. Gary Milan

Military uniform (jacket, epaulets, waistcoat, breeches, tricorn hat, and wig) and leather satchel of Jonathan Bancroft of Massachusetts, 1777-ca. 1789. From the collection of Dr. Gary Milan.

The day I planned to bring my eleven-year-old son, Benjamin, to Creating the United States, I called my dad. My parents still live in the house I grew up in, just a few towns over from where the shot heard ‘round the world rang out (this is how Schoolhouse Rocks memorialized that event, remember?) and only a short trip from where Paul Revere rode his famous ride. Dad, who grew up in Lexington, MA, is a man who has always been surrounded by—and fascinated with—history.

In fact, it was my dad whom I thought most about when I first walked through Creating the United States. I looked closely at the old documents, the artifacts, and the photographs, and took a journey through the American Revolution. As I stood in front of the uniform of a Continental Army officer (which also caught the eye of The Family Savvy, in this enthusiastic write-up), I thought of Dad and the stories he told about Revolutionary War muskets that our family once housed as part of a collection.

A historical artifact from my family’s own American story: Danforth Maxcy's canteen.

A historical artifact from my family’s own American story: Danforth Maxcy's canteen.

The old satchel displayed alongside the uniform reminded me of things that men carried to war, like the Civil War−era canteen that still sits in my parents’ living room. It once belonged to Danforth Maxcy (my great-great-great-great-uncle), who was injured at the Battle of Gettysburg and died on the train ride back home to Maine. He was twenty-one. Continue reading

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We Miss You, Sunset Concerts!

It’s Thursday at the Skirball, and you know what that means…Sunset Conc…– Oh, wait…The usual hum of set-up didn’t greet me when I arrived at work this morning. There’s no stage over the lily pond, and not a peep from the courtyard. You mean there won’t be a sound check?!

Sadly, summer is gone, and with it went Sunset Concerts 2012. But what a summer it was! And you know what they say: time flies when you’re having fun. On this first post–Sunset Concerts Thursday, here is a look back at all six shows of the season, highlighting the joy they brought, and will always bring, to our community.

Samba Mapangala & Orchestra Virunga kicked off the season in late July. Visitors danced from the very first note until the band left the stage. Here, Samba and a bandmate start their own synchronized dance. Everywhere one looked, one could see people learning the steps and joining in. Photo by Bonnie Perkinson.

Samba Mapangala & Orchestra Virunga kicked off the season in late July. Visitors danced from the very first note until the band left the stage. Here, Samba and a bandmate start their own synchronized dance. Everywhere one looked, one could see people learning the steps and joining in. Photo by Bonnie Perkinson.

Probably one of the most memorable moments of the night: What began as Samba and three ensemble dancers grooving… turned into a party onstage! The concert vibe was incredibly upbeat all night long! Photo by Bonnie Perkinson.

Probably one of the most memorable moments of the night: What began as Samba and three ensemble dancers grooving… turned into a party onstage! The concert vibe was incredibly upbeat all night long! Photo by Bonnie Perkinson.

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Step Right Up for Family Fun

I can’t believe it’s Labor Day Weekend! There hasn’t been a dull moment here in Family Programs all summer long. What has been so wonderful is to see families come in for one of our Family Amphitheater Performances, check out the Family Art Studio, pop over to our archaeological dig site, and play games as part of our Game On! program….all in one afternoon. One day, there was a family from Miami who had never been to the Skirball. When they arrived at the art studio, their eldest daughter (there were three kids total, and I’m guessing the eldest was around eleven) was feeling a bit grumpy. She just didn’t want to be there (there was even some tears). But by the time they left, the whole family was all smiles. The mom let me know how grateful she was that they had visited such a wonderful and special place. That’s music to my ears!

Just one more weekend to enjoy summer family fun at the Skirball. To get you excited about coming over, check out some highlights that I (along with a few from photographer friends) captured from the past few weeks.

“Yay, puppets!” squeals one toddler named Azalea, who came to see marionette artist Scott Land perform in the amphitheater!

“Yay, puppets!” proclaims one toddler named Azalea, who came to see marionette artist Scott Land perform in the amphitheater!

Scott Land's traditional marionettes wait patiently before taking center stage.

Scott Land's traditional marionettes wait patiently before taking center stage.

Scott Land does a synchronized dance using a pair of matching skeleton puppets, which leaves the crowd in stitches!

Scott Land does a synchronized dance using a pair of matching skeleton puppets, which leaves the crowd in stitches!

How’d he do that? Scott Land's clown puppet blows up a balloon before everyone’s eyes.

How’d he do that? Scott Land's clown puppet blows up a balloon before everyone’s eyes.

Filipino dance and music ensemble Kayamanan Ng Lahi captivates audiences with graceful moves and colorful costumes.

Filipino dance and music ensemble Kayamanan Ng Lahi captivates audiences with graceful moves and colorful costumes.

Kayamanan Ng Lahi features more than a dozen children, who were all crowd favorites.

Kayamanan Ng Lahi features more than a dozen children, who were all crowd favorites.

Volunteer teen Carla helps a young visitor create a shadow puppet. Throughout the summer, these dedicated teens have been a fixture in our Family Art Studio, working one on one with children.

Volunteer teen Carla helps a young visitor create a shadow puppet. Throughout the summer, these dedicated teens have been a fixture in our Family Art Studio, working one on one with children.

Kids and grown-ups delighted in seeing their creations come to life. Many families who didn't know each other performed little plays for one another.

Kids and grown-ups delighted in seeing their creations come to life. Many families who didn't know each other performed little plays for one another.

All summer long, visitors could play oversized board games as part of our “Game On!” family program. These teens invented their own version of giant checkers.

All summer long, visitors could play oversized board games as part of our “Game On!” family program. These teens invented their own version of giant checkers.

Connect Four is a board game classic. Better yet if it’s a jumbo version like this one!

Connect Four is a board game classic. Better yet if it’s a jumbo version like this one!

This little visitor was proud of her skills in the toss game. She wanted me to see how well she could toss.

This little visitor was proud of her skills in the toss game. She wanted me to see how well she could toss.

A dad and his daughters spend a relaxing afternoon doing this puzzle at the Skirball’s archaeological dig site.

A dad and his daughters spend a relaxing afternoon doing this puzzle at the Skirball’s archaeological dig site.

Young archaeologists discover something hidden in the sand… and wonder what it is!

Young archaeologists discover something hidden in the sand… and wonder what it is!

Happy visitors grooves to the folk tunes of musician Melissa Green.

Happy visitors grooves to the folk tunes of musician Melissa Green.

This music fan couldn’t help but get up and dance to Melissa Green

This music fan couldn’t help but get up and dance to Melissa Green.

Melissa Green performs a rousing rendition of “Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”… this little visitor bumps her head every time!

And when Melissa Green performs a rousing rendition of “Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”… this little visitor bumps her head every time!

Between songs—“Jewish music with a twist”—the ensemble Mostly Kosher cracked up the audience with their family-friendly jokes. They also taught a few Yiddish phrases!

Between songs—“Jewish music with a twist”—the ensemble Mostly Kosher cracked up the audience with their family-friendly jokes. They also taught a few Yiddish phrases!

Mostly Kosher’s lively songs featured wonderful strings.

Mostly Kosher’s lively songs featured wonderful strings.

In between their comedic interludes, Mostly Kosher's female vocalist sang a gorgeous song in Hebrew

In between their comedic interludes, Mostly Kosher's female vocalist sang a gorgeous song in Hebrew.

Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam band had no trouble getting kids to jam right along with them.

Lucky Diaz and the Family Jam band had no trouble getting kids to jam right along with them.

It’s been a hot summer, so our rainbow mist arbor was a popular attraction. These kids even brought their own swimsuits!

It’s been a hot summer, so our rainbow mist arbor was a popular attraction. These kids even brought their own swimsuits! Photo by Peter Turman.

A little girl named Astrid gets a lift from her dad. This was her first venture into the rainbow mist and won’t be her last!

A little girl named Astrid gets a lift from her dad. This was her first venture into the rainbow mist and won’t be her last! Photo by Bonnie Perkinson.

“Yay, puppets!” squeals one toddler named Azalea, who came to see marionette artist Scott Land perform in the amphitheater!Scott Land's traditional marionettes wait patiently before taking center stage.Scott Land does a synchronized dance using a pair of matching skeleton puppets, which leaves the crowd in stitches!How’d he do that? Scott Land's clown puppet blows up a balloon before everyone’s eyes.Filipino dance and music ensemble Kayamanan Ng Lahi captivates audiences with graceful moves and colorful costumes.Kayamanan Ng Lahi features more than a dozen children, who were all crowd favorites.Volunteer teen Carla helps a young visitor create a shadow puppet. Throughout the summer, these dedicated teens have been a fixture in our Family Art Studio, working one on one with children.Kids and grown-ups delighted in seeing their creations come to life. Many families who didn't know each other performed little plays for one another.All summer long, visitors could play oversized board games as part of our “Game On!” family program. These teens invented their own version of giant checkers.Connect Four is a board game classic. Better yet if it’s a jumbo version like this one!This little visitor was proud of her skills in the toss game. She wanted me to see how well she could toss.A dad and his daughters spend a relaxing afternoon doing this puzzle at the Skirball’s archaeological dig site.Young archaeologists discover something hidden in the sand… and wonder what it is!Happy visitors grooves to the folk tunes of musician Melissa Green.This music fan couldn’t help but get up and dance to Melissa GreenMelissa Green performs a rousing rendition of “Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”… this little visitor bumps her head every time!Between songs—“Jewish music with a twist”—the ensemble Mostly Kosher cracked up the audience with their family-friendly jokes. They also taught a few Yiddish phrases!Mostly Kosher’s lively songs featured wonderful strings.In between their comedic interludes, Mostly Kosher's female vocalist sang a gorgeous song in HebrewLucky Diaz and the Family Jam band had no trouble getting kids to jam right along with them.It’s been a hot summer, so our rainbow mist arbor was a popular attraction. These kids even brought their own swimsuits!A little girl named Astrid gets a lift from her dad. This was her first venture into the rainbow mist and won’t be her last!
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A Special Place for Everyone: A Summer Intern’s Perspective

A simple biblical passage that transformed into an unforgettable lesson for me this summer.

A simple biblical passage that transformed into an unforgettable lesson for me this summer.

It was a Tuesday morning and a group of summer interns and new hires were gathered in the lobby. We were waiting to tour the Skirball’s permanent exhibition Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America guided by the extremely knowledgeable Museum Director, Dr. Robert Kirschner. As one of only two Multicultural Undergraduate Interns, funded by the Getty Foundation, lucky enough to work at the Skirball this summer, I had the pleasure of going on this exclusive walkthrough. The tour began with Dr. Kirschner’s passionate remarks about the Skirball’s beginnings, the Skirball’s President and CEO, Uri Herscher (with whom I’ve met on multiple occasions and who is absolutely wonderful!), and Dr. Kirschner’s personal dedication to the museum.

Most importantly, he spoke of the Skirball mission as a Jewish institution that welcomes both Jews and non-Jews. As I enter the final days of my Skirball internship, I am more and more convinced that everyone is welcome here regardless of a person’s culture, religion, or race.

Here is a photo of the beautiful handsewn “Proclaim Liberty” Torah mantle. It was made by Peachy Levy in Santa Monica in 1991. Wool, embroidered and appliquéd with cotton and metallic thread. HUCSM 60.138.

Here is a photo of the beautiful handsewn “Proclaim Liberty” Torah mantle. It was made by Peachy Levy in Santa Monica in 1991. Wool, embroidered and appliquéd with cotton and metallic thread. HUCSM 60.138.

When Dr. Kirschner guided us to the entrance of the exhibition, I stood face-to-face with a simple yet powerful statement: “Go forth…and be a blessing” [The writer of this LA Times article about the opening of the Skirball in 1996 took note of this detail as well.] He urged us to look beyond the biblical context of the passage (it’s from the Book of Genesis) and to view it as a philosophy about inclusivity and universality—a philosophy by which all of us should aspire to live, one that encourages people of all cultures to be a blessing in the world and to all humankind. What I loved most was that this message is physically and philosophically ingrained into the Skirball’s foundations.

We walked a few steps ahead and there I saw one of the Skirball’s most prized possessions. A beautifully sewn object displayed behind glass beckoned me to take a closer look. Dr. Kirschner explained that it was a Torah case. When I was close enough to read what’s embroidered in the fabric, I became even more fascinated. Similar to the passage engraved in stone at the entrance, this object carried a biblical passage (this time from Leviticus) with a universal message: “Proclaim liberty throughout the land.” These words, it turns out, are also written on the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, a truly American treasure.

Recently I had the opportunity to learn more about this Torah case when I spoke with Adele Lander Burke, VP of Learning for Life, who oversees the Skirball docent program. She told me that in place of the object currently on view, there used to be a Torah scroll open to the exact same verse. But the Skirball decided that the Torah case, with its red, white, and blue motif and message about freedom, was more symbolic of the American values and ideals that are central to the Skirball mission. I also learned that the light tan color of the scroll image was meant to represent the lyrics “amber waves of grain” from “America the Beautiful.” All of these details underscored the Skirball’s deep interest in the American story, which brings me to my favorite part of the exhibition: the Liberty Gallery. Continue reading

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A Night Out at Sunset Concerts

These two found a nice spot to dance behind the stage. Photo by Mitch Maher.

These two found a nice spot to dance behind the stage. Photo by Mitch Maher.

Look at these happy people. Smiling, dancing, grooving… enjoying music under the stars. That could be you. Bring a date, or meet someone here—either way, Sunset Concerts at the Skirball is a great night out. The 2012 season kicks off this Thursday night, when Samba Mapangala & Orchestra Virunga take the stage.

And have we mentioned that the concerts are free? And that our galleries (except Noah’s Ark at the Skirball) are also free and open until 10:00 p.m.?

If you like to plan ahead, here are tips on how to attend Sunset Concerts like a pro and how to do it on your budget, from cheapest options to best ways to splurge. Feel free to mix and match!

Find a nice grassy patch to picnic with friends. Photo by John Elder.

Picnic with friends. Photo by John Elder.

THE SUPER SAVER NIGHT WITH FRIENDS
Round up your buddies and get on the bus!
Transportation: Plan your trip with metro.net and go to and from the Skirball for $1.50 each way. Plus no parking fees. Metro Rapic 761 drops off right in front of our main entrance. Just remember to bring your Metro passes. You’ll have to show them to get your tickets into the venue.
Food: Bring a delicious dinner with you from home! You may bring in food, but outside alcoholic beverages are not permitted. For some good ideas on how to jazz up your menu, this oldie but goodie from Mark Bittman is our go-to guide. There is a grassy area on the balcony above the stage that is perfect for picnicking.
Drinks: Cash bar available on site, or bring nonalcoholic drinks from home.
Concert tickets: Admission to the concert is free! Continue reading

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