About Mia Cariño

Mia Cariño is Vice President, Communications and Marketing, at the Skirball, which generally means she thinks about words, pictures, the stories they convey, the people to whom to tell them, and what it takes to tell them well. Her daughter, Astrid, is named after Astrid Kirchherr, Astrid Lindgren, and Astrud Gilberto: not a bad trio of women. Mia has lived in Manila, New York, Toronto, Manila, Bryn Mawr, and Philadelphia, and has now lived in Los Angeles longer than she's ever lived anywhere. It's home.

18 Selfies of the Skirball at 18 (Well, If It Could Take a Selfie)

Happy birthday, Skirball! Today you turn eighteen. If you were like other Angelenos your age, you might be spending these days preparing for prom… or waiting for college acceptance letters… or applying for that job you weren’t eligible for until now. Hopefully you’d live up to your mission and register to vote and not dodge jury duty. You’re not quite old enough for a cocktail, but we’ll toast you nonetheless.

It’s been a good year for you, Skirball. At last, your fifteen-acre campus was completed, and in grand style at that. The Jewish Journal took note of the special occasion in a cover story on your founder, Uri D. Herscher, and he and architect Moshe Safdie reflected upon the journey of your building on film. Of this particular birthday, Uri also reminds us, “Eighteen in Jewish life is special cause for celebration, for in Hebrew the number spells life—and the Skirball’s life is thriving like never before.”

Now, as an eighteen-year-old, you would certainly spend a ton of your time taking selfies and posting them online—if only you could. But since you can’t, a few of us on staff took some for you. Here are eighteen gorgeous—and some unexpected—views of you, all taken in the last week or so. Thanks for being home to us and to so many of our visitors. Happy eighteenth!

A graceful curve toward the new Herscher Hall and Guerin Pavilion. Photo by Madeline Tuthill.

A graceful curve toward the new Herscher Hall and Guerin Pavilion. Photo by Madeline Tuthill.

On concrete and Tadoussac stone, the early morning sun signals a new day. Photo by Mia Cariño.

On concrete and Tadoussac stone, the early morning sun signals a new day. Photo by Mia Cariño.

Cypress trees bring a distinctively California Mediterranean vibe to the campus. Photo by Patrice Mineshima.

Cypress trees bring a distinctively California Mediterranean vibe to the campus. Photo by Patrice Mineshima.

A rectangle of light, at the foot of the staircase behind the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Kim Kandel.

A rectangle of light, at the foot of the staircase behind the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Kim Kandel.

Shadows on the second floor colonnade in the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Shadows on the second floor colonnade in the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Paver stones beckon visitors to this contemplative spot off the Taper Courtyard mezzanine. Have you stepped inside? Photo by Candice Crawford.

Paver stones beckon visitors to this contemplative spot off the Taper Courtyard mezzanine. Have you stepped inside? Photo by Candice Crawford.

The dig site on a sunny day, ready for budding archaeologists. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

The dig site on a sunny day, ready for budding archaeologists. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

Lounging on the hidden bench on the terrace. Photo by Sara Kahlenberg.

Lounging on the hidden bench on the terrace. Photo by Sara Kahlenberg.

Find out where you fit in <i>Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America</i>. Photo by Sue Boorujy-Larson.

Find out where you fit in Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America. Photo by Sue Boorujy-Larson.

Discovering one of the secret hiding places aboard Noah's Ark. Photo by Lisa Delgin.

Discovering one of the secret hiding places aboard Noah's Ark. Photo by Lisa Delgin.

Aviator butterflies in Noah's Ark at the Skirball. Photo by Jennifer Caballero.

Aviator butterflies in Noah's Ark at the Skirball. Photo by Jennifer Caballero.

Deer grazing near the rainbow mist arbor. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

Deer grazing near the rainbow mist arbor. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

A giant cricket pays a visit. Photo by Sara Marino.

A giant cricket pays a visit. Photo by Sara Marino.

The changing light on the Kopple Terrace. Photo by Tom Schirtz.

The changing light on the Kopple Terrace. Photo by Tom Schirtz.

A rainbow (or two) always trumps the selfie. Turning the camera to look out across the canyon. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

A rainbow (or two) always trumps the selfie. Turning the camera to look out across the canyon. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

Tere O'Connor Dance performs in the Getty Gallery. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Tere O'Connor Dance performs in the Getty Gallery. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Sunset at the Skirball. Photo by Candice Crawford.

Sunset at the Skirball. Photo by Candice Crawford.

All roads lead to Skirball. Photo by Ernie Mondaca.

All roads lead to Skirball. Photo by Ernie Mondaca.

A graceful curve toward the new Herscher Hall and Guerin Pavilion. Photo by Madeline Tuthill.On concrete and Tadoussac stone, the early morning sun signals a new day. Photo by Mia Cariño.Cypress trees bring a distinctively California Mediterranean vibe to the campus. Photo by Patrice Mineshima.A rectangle of light, at the foot of the staircase behind the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Kim Kandel.Shadows on the second floor colonnade in the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Daniel Soto.Paver stones beckon visitors to this contemplative spot off the Taper Courtyard mezzanine. Have you stepped inside? Photo by Candice Crawford.The dig site on a sunny day, ready for budding archaeologists. Photo by Jen Maxcy.Lounging on the hidden bench on the terrace. Photo by Sara Kahlenberg.Find out where you fit in Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America. Photo by Sue Boorujy-Larson.Discovering one of the secret hiding places aboard Noah's Ark. Photo by Lisa Delgin.Aviator butterflies in Noah's Ark at the Skirball. Photo by Jennifer Caballero.Deer grazing near the rainbow mist arbor. Photo by Jen Maxcy.A giant cricket pays a visit. Photo by Sara Marino.The changing light on the Kopple Terrace. Photo by Tom Schirtz.A rainbow (or two) always trumps the selfie. Turning the camera to look out across the canyon. Photo by Jen Maxcy.Tere O'Connor Dance performs in the Getty Gallery. Photo by Daniel Soto.Sunset at the Skirball. Photo by Candice Crawford.All roads lead to Skirball. Photo by Ernie Mondaca.

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#SafdieSnapshots: Share Yours!

The first contribution to our #SafdieSnapshots photo album: “You never know who you might see at the SkyPark at Marina Bay Sands: if you’re an early riser, you might just be lucky enough to see a world-famous architect swimming laps in the infinity pool he created!” (Julia K)

The first contribution to our #SafdieSnapshots photo album: “You never know who you might see at the SkyPark at Marina Bay Sands: if you’re an early riser, you might just be lucky enough to see a world-famous architect swimming laps in the infinity pool he created!” (Julia K)

Here are two good New Year’s Resolutions for us all: (1) travel more; and (2) organize the thousands of photos we all store on too many devices, hard drives, and clouds. If you’ve managed to do a bit of (1) and need help achieving (2), then share your #SafdieSnapshots!

Since opening the retrospective Global Citizen: The Architecture of Moshe Safdie, many gallery visitors have raved about their personal experiences of an actual Safdie building. What about you? Been moved at Yad Vashem Holocaust History Museum? Gone to Habitat ‘67 or Crystal Bridges or the Peabody Essex? Or (lucky you!) have you swum in the infinity pool way up high atop Marina Bay Sands?

Well, here’s hoping you took a camera with you. We invite you to contribute your fave pix to our #SafdieSnapshots photo album. E-mail your contributions to blog@skirball.org—or share them via Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram using the hashtag #SafdieSnapshots. Continue reading

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Architect Moshe Safdie Likes Legos (Breaking Bad Fans Do, Too)

Here’s my attempt to build Habitat ’67 out of Legos like Moshe Safdie once did. My preschooler wanted her Duplo® back… and I longed for stronger spatial skills.

Here’s my attempt to build Habitat ’67 out of Legos like Moshe Safdie once did. My preschooler wanted her Duplo® back… and I longed for stronger spatial skills.

If you’re a parent of a young child, like I am, you likely have LEGO® in your house. With some relief—since Legos are a fairly wholesome, harmless distraction—and maybe even pride, you’ve watched your kid stack and lock those distinctive bricks of plastic for hours on end. You’ve probably gotten down on the floor to join the fun. [Less fun: stepping on a Lego.]

Lately it feels like I encounter Legos in more places than my living room. In early summer, I kept hearing about an exhibition, The Art of the Brick®, on view at a surprising venue: Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale. At its hilltop museum, my family and I eyed thirty awe-inspiring sculptures by “brick artist” Nathan Sawaya, who used thousands of Legos to handcraft each work. A few weeks later, two separate groups of friends reported that the new hotel at LEGOLAND was actually pretty cool. In mid-July, I stumbled upon a story on NPR.org probing why the Danish toy company had launched a product line specifically for girls. The reporter concluded with the right question: “Would it be so hard to develop—even market—toys for girls and boys to enjoy together?” On his “Thinking Brickly” blog, David Pickett studies the Lego gender gap more closely.

As summer waned, Legos continued to pop up in my life. Lost in a Breaking Bad internet vortex as the series finale drew near, I learned that a Lego imitator, Citizen Brick, quickly sold out of its controversial “Superlab Playset,” featuring “minifigs” of Walt (in yellow lab suit), Gus (in Los Pollos Hermanos button-down), and Mike (sporting grey stubble but looking far less hard-boiled as on TV).

Walter White and Jesse Pinkman’s underground “office” = totally disturbing plaything

Walter White and Jesse Pinkman’s underground “office” = totally disturbing plaything

Eventually Legos became a topic of conversation at work, as we geared up for our fall exhibition, Global Citizen: The Architecture of Moshe Safdie, opening October 22. As it turns out, the renowned architect, who has designed and built our Skirball campus in four phases over thirty years, used to toy around with Legos early in his career. In his book The City After the Automobile: An Architect’s Vision (Westview, 1998), Safdie describes how he began to develop a new concept for urban housing:

I began constructing large models out of Lego, stacking plastic blocks representing houses one on top of the other, each one forming a roof garden for the unit above…. This would lead two years later to Habitat, a project I designed and constructed as part of the 1967 world’s fair in Montreal.

Each of the units kinda does look like a Lego, huh? Habitat’67. Construction view. Image courtesy of Safdie Architects.

Each of the units kinda looks like a Lego, huh? Habitat ’67. Construction view. Image courtesy of Safdie Architects.

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WHERE IN L.A. SHOULD TOBY GO?

Toby on the wallGary Baseman’s beloved companion, Toby, has been all over the world, from Rio to Chiang Mai, Moscow to D.C. But what L.A. hotspot do you think he has missed? Let us know by July 26 and Gary will pick one of your suggestions and take a photo of Toby there. Come see the photographic proof of Toby’s visit unveiled before the exhibition closes on August 18, 2013!

Share your ideas via E-mail, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or Pinterest
basemanshome@skirball.org
#basemanshome
If you include your name we will let you know if your idea is picked!

Or comment below and we’ll add your idea to the list.

Here’s a running list of your ideas so far:

  • Top of Runyon Canyon (anonymous)

  • Burbank Horse Stables (submitted by Jennifer)

  • On the Monkey Bars at the Willow Elementary School Playground in Agoura Hills (submitted by Lisa) Continue reading

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New Films Added to the Jewish Homegrown History Mix

Just nine days until Jewish Homegrown History closes! And now’s a great time to come back or see the exhibition for the first time. Three recently remixed and newly added films are now on view, thanks to The Labyrinth Project team that created the installation. These new home movies came to Labyrinth’s attention through contacts made at our Home Movie Day at the Skirball in the spring.

Here’s a quick rundown and a few screengrabs of the new films:

FAMILY SECRETS: EVADING HISTORICAL TRAUMA
Peter Vanlaw did not discover that he and his German émigré family were Jewish until he had a heart attack in his fifties. His story is driven by unsolved mysteries concerning his grandmother’s suicide, his mother’s mental breakdown, and his father’s repeated attempts to escape family history. Combining melodrama and historical trauma, this story supports scholar Michele Citron’s claim that “home movies were powerful and necessary fictions that allowed us to see and explore truths that could only be looked at obliquely.” Edited by Daniel Bydlowski.

 In 1929, Peter Vanlaw’s parents, Kurt Weinlaub and Lilly Rayfish, were newlyweds enjoying their prosperity at the Winston apartments in Hollywood, but then came the Stock Market Crash that seriously rocked their world.

In 1929, Peter Vanlaw’s parents, Kurt Weinlaub and Lilly Rayfish, were newlyweds enjoying their prosperity at the Winston apartments in Hollywood, but then came the Stock Market Crash that seriously rocked their world.

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A Night Out at Sunset Concerts

These two found a nice spot to dance behind the stage. Photo by Mitch Maher.

These two found a nice spot to dance behind the stage. Photo by Mitch Maher.

Look at these happy people. Smiling, dancing, grooving… enjoying music under the stars. That could be you. Bring a date, or meet someone here—either way, Sunset Concerts at the Skirball is a great night out. The 2012 season kicks off this Thursday night, when Samba Mapangala & Orchestra Virunga take the stage.

And have we mentioned that the concerts are free? And that our galleries (except Noah’s Ark at the Skirball) are also free and open until 10:00 p.m.?

If you like to plan ahead, here are tips on how to attend Sunset Concerts like a pro and how to do it on your budget, from cheapest options to best ways to splurge. Feel free to mix and match!

Find a nice grassy patch to picnic with friends. Photo by John Elder.

Picnic with friends. Photo by John Elder.

THE SUPER SAVER NIGHT WITH FRIENDS
Round up your buddies and get on the bus!
Transportation: Plan your trip with metro.net and go to and from the Skirball for $1.50 each way. Plus no parking fees. Metro Rapic 761 drops off right in front of our main entrance. Just remember to bring your Metro passes. You’ll have to show them to get your tickets into the venue.
Food: Bring a delicious dinner with you from home! You may bring in food, but outside alcoholic beverages are not permitted. For some good ideas on how to jazz up your menu, this oldie but goodie from Mark Bittman is our go-to guide. There is a grassy area on the balcony above the stage that is perfect for picnicking.
Drinks: Cash bar available on site, or bring nonalcoholic drinks from home.
Concert tickets: Admission to the concert is free! Continue reading

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From X the Owl to Snow Leopards to Frog Belly Rat Bone

The Rogue Artists Ensemble will perform The Story of Frog Belly Rat Bone this Sunday at the Skirball's Puppet Festival. Another step in my short but ongoing journey knowing puppets.

The Rogue Artists Ensemble will perform The Story of Frog Belly Rat Bone this Sunday at the Skirball's Puppet Festival. Another step in my short but ongoing journey knowing puppets.

So the early history of me and puppets is probably not dissimilar from yours if you were born in the early seventies. It goes something like this:

When I was really little, King Friday and Queen Sara Saturday ruled a kingdom of hand puppets on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Cornflake S. Pecially manufactured rocking chairs, X the Owl admired Ben Franklin from inside an oak tree, and Lady Elaine Fairchilde lived in a Museum-Go-Round, a design concept that would either delight or nauseate (or both), but give architecture critics plenty to chew on.

Daniel Stripèd Tiger inhabited a grandmother clock in Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood of Make-Believe.

Daniel Stripèd Tiger inhabited a grandmother clock on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood of Make-Believe. Courtesy of Photofest.

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Connecting (and Coloring) the Dots

This gallery wall was designed to illustrate the sixty million girls and women who are “missing”  from the world because of their gender. It’s a participatory experience that one student who visited recently took very seriously.

This gallery wall was designed to illustrate the tragic fact that sixty million girls and women are “missing” from the world because of their gender. It’s a participatory experience that one student who visited recently took very seriously.

Inside the exhibition Women Hold Up Half the Sky, one wall of the gallery is covered with dots—20,000 of them, give or take a few. Each one measures about an inch in diameter, a thin blue line rounding an empty center. Over time visitors have filled in the white circles, transforming the mostly blank space into a field of tenderly hand-colored dots.

The 20,000 are meant to represent, if only in part, the sixty million girls and women estimated to be “missing” worldwide because of sex-selective abortion, female infanticide, or gender-specific abuse or neglect—or what an article in The Economist calls “gendercide” (the article also increases the estimate to 100 million). It’s a startling, sobering figure. While standing before this giant display of thousands upon thousands of dots, visitors are invited to take a moment and color in a circle in honor of a life lost.

A young middle-schooler, B.J. Dare, who toured the exhibition as part of a recent school field trip, colored in more than a dot or two, then chose to share the experience with online reading and writing community Figment. We stumbled upon it late last week, and we were moved. Here’s an excerpt of B.J.’s composition “A Trip to the Skirball”:

I colored and colored and colored and colored. Every dot was a new color, some were multi-color. For each dot, I felt like I was trying to help, or give support, somehow. Continue reading

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Introducing SkirBlog!

Welcome to SkirBlog, just another way into the Skirball. Photo by John Elder.

A few weeks ago, a woman from the East African nation of Burundi found herself visiting our newest exhibition, Women Hold Up Half the Sky. She was part of a small entourage traveling with the African Union Ambassador to the U.S. As the group walked through the gallery with the Skirball’s Museum Director, Robert Kirschner, the Burundian woman suddenly stopped in her tracks, listening intently. She thought she must be imagining it, for what she heard were the voices of girls singing a traditional Burundian lullaby. Where was that sound coming from, so far away from home? Bob assured her that the music was in fact part of the commissioned audio installation Amplify, by multimedia artist Ben Rubin, designed specifically to amplify the voices of women and girls that often go unheard. Moved by the idea of the project and the music from her homeland, our visitor asked if she could listen again.

This story quickly made its way around the Skirball, as stories tend to do around here. On any given day, at any moment—while grabbing a cup of coffee, rushing across the courtyard for a meeting, working a lecture or concert—any one of us staff or volunteers hears about… well, all sorts of things. Baby hummingbirds abandoned on campus and lovingly rescued by security staff and Noah’s Ark facilitators. A shy teen who found his voice participating in the Skirball’s spoken-word residency and, on the last day of the program, read a surprisingly emotional poem before a crowd of fellow high schoolers. A curator’s eye-opening visit to the L.A. home of a legendary émigré artist whose lesser-known work in film may well be the subject of an upcoming exhibition (spoiler alert not needed; we’ll tell you about it when we can). Negotiations underway for a double-bill concert starring Algerian Jewish pianist Maurice El Medioni and Cuban percussionist Roberto Rodriguez, whose joint album Descarga Oriental blew our programming team away. Continue reading

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