About Jordan Peimer

Jordan Peimer is Vice President and Director of Programs. You're most likely to spot him at Peets every morning, performance showcases, movie theaters, concert venues, and cheap ethnic restaurants. What was the best thing he's seen lately? The forthcoming film On My Way, starring Catherine Deneuve. With every new post by Jordan, we'll be updating his profile to share what's the best thing he's seen/heard/participated in lately.

Sistuhs Are Doin’ It For Themselves

Equality and justice are issues that drive singer, songwriter, dancer, and women’s rights activist Sayon Bamba.

When I first saw Sayon Bamba live in concert, I was immediately struck by her charisma and power. She has a bold voice and a stunning stage presence. I was taken not only by her mastery of different styles, from Afropop to singer/songwriter, but also to her unwavering commitment to human rights and women’s causes. While I never had the opportunity to see Bamba perform as onetime frontwoman for the iconic Les Amazones de Guinée, I am thrilled that this under-known artist will be making her US debut at the Skirball next Friday night as part of Women Hold Up Half the Sky related programming.

As we planned for the concert, it made me realize just how captivated I am by strong female artistic voices. Below is a short list, in no particular order, of some of my favorites, all of whom I have been fortunate enough to meet.

Patti Smith—From the earliest days of her career, Patti Smith captured my attention. There has never been anyone quite like her. Although she honors all the “strong female influences” on her art—check out this recent BBC Radio interview in which Smith acknowledges Janis Joplin and Grace Slick—she is a true trailblazer, with a unique voice and a singular ear for the English language. Her music and poetry have led me to a greater understanding and appreciation of literature and spirituality. It’s hard to pick just one, but as far as I’m concerned, her debut release, Horses, is the must-have Patti Smith album. And where did I meet her? I presented her in concert back when I was vice chair of the University of Pennsylvania concert committee. I won’t soon forget hanging out with Patti in a backstage bathroom of all places.

Doris Lessing—One of my favorite writers, the 2007 Nobel Laureate in Literature started her career writing about the injustices she witnessed in her native Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and has never waivered from trying to imagine a better world. Her attachment to the inequities of Harare and the apartheid system led her to political activism, both personally and through her writing. Lessing’s interest in all that is possible motivated her to create science fiction, which were really explorations of her utopian ideals. My favorite Lessing work? The Making of the Representative for Planet 8. It didn’t make a recent Huffington Post “Lessing Top 5” list (compiled in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of The Golden Notebook), but I stand by my choice.

Phranc—In the midst of citywide Olympic sponsorship fever, Phranc unofficially declared herself the “Official Jewish Lesbian Folksinger of the 1984 Summer Olympics.” Even if that seems like a narrow field in which to distinguish oneself, the singer, visual artist, and athlete—Phranc is a competitive swimmer and a skilled surfer—possesses a gold medal–caliber voice and a winning sense of humor, and is a torchbearer for social justice (is that too many Olympics references? Sorry…). Her cultural identity as a Jew has played a central role in her life’s work. Phranc has performed at the Skirball on three occasions and remains a favorite of mine after twenty-eight years. Continue reading

Share

Paul and George (But Not John or Ringo), Together on Stage

Filmmaker Paul Mazurksy (pictured with mic in hand) had the audience in stitches at last night's Q&A with him and frequent writing partner Leon Capetanos. Highlight of the night was a truly hilarious tale of how Paul roped Federico Fellini, whom he had long admired, into making his on-screen debut in Paul's "Alex in Wonderland".

Filmmaker Paul Mazurksy (pictured with mic in hand) had the audience in stitches at Wednesday night's Q&A with him and frequent writing partner Leon Capetanos. Highlight of the night was a truly hilarious tale of how Paul roped Federico Fellini, whom he had long admired, into making his on-screen debut in Paul's Alex in Wonderland.

Here’s some late-breaking news that I was able to announce from the stage at Wednesday night’s kick-off to our Through a Glass Brightly: A Paul Mazursky Retrospective:

Swing by the Skirball on April 3rd to watch Blume in Love—the second evening screening in the series—and you’ll get a chance to hear filmmaker Paul Mazursky in conversation with actor George Segal.

Paul, of course, was the writer and director of the 1973 drama about a Beverly Hills divorce lawyer who’s got his own problems in love and life. Winner of the 2010 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Lifetime Achievement Award, Paul was the creative mind behind a run of memorable films, including Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Harry & Tonto (my personal favorite of all Mazurskies), Enemies: A Love Story, and Down and Out in Beverly Hills. (For younger audiences, he may be better known for his appearances on HBO, on both The Sopranos and Curb Your Enthusiasm.)

Continue reading

Share

“Unapologetic Agitations” by Modern Dance Artist Nora Chipaumire

Nora Chipaumire: Zimbabwean native, Bessie Award winner, and 2011 USA Ford Fellow. Photo by Antoine Tempe.

Although I’d heard about choreographer/dancer and 2011 USA Ford Fellow Nora Chipaumire for several years, it wasn’t until the summer of 2006 that I saw her perform for myself. It was at Bytom, Poland’s XIII Annual International Contemporary Dance Conference and Performance Festival. Nora’s master classes in modern and African dance created a buzz among both the students and her fellow teachers, and the solos I saw her perform were transfixing. Both works—Convoys, Curfews, and Roadblocks and Dark Swan—demonstrated not just her physical prowess, but also an intriguing intellect. These will be presented as part of her evenings of performance at the Skirball this weekend.

Nora will also give a sneak preview of a substantial excerpt-in-progress from her latest solo work, Miriam, which employs the music of Miriam Makeba (1932–2008). Widely known by her nickname, “Mama Afrika,” Makeba was an exiled South African musician who brought the realities of apartheid into the living rooms of music fans around the world. While Miriam examines the burden of representing a culture to a larger society, it’s not meant to be a biography of Makeba. Instead, it draws inspiration from Makeba’s life story, as well as from Chipaumire’s own experiences as a self-exiled Zimbabwean.

Click on the image above to see a snippet of Nora performing Convoys, Curfews, and Roadblocks. At the Skirball, she’ll perform inside our spacious Milken Gallery.

Continue reading

Share

Vent D’Ouest Klezmer Band: Two Guitars and Then Some

Vent D’Ouest’s two guitarists drive the band’s rhythms and impressed the audience at the International Jewish Music Festival last year. Here’s a quick snap of them plucking away on one guitar simultaneously!

The International Jewish Music Festival (or, as the Dutch call it, the Joods Muziek Festival) takes place across Holland every October. This past year, I was fortunate to attend, and I caught a stand-out performance in the city of Utrecht, at the Merkaz Cultural Center, by the French klezmer ensemble Vent D’Ouest. Merkaz was an interesting destination in itself: it was a Jewish orphanage before World War II. Representing the liberal Jewish community of Utrecht, the Merkaz Foundation was lucky to snag one of the few local buildings that had any Jewish history.

A quartet of French talents, Vent D’Ouest has an unusual make-up for a klezmer group. The band features clarinet and accordion, as expected, but then there’s the unlikely addition of two guitars. Together the four members, all natural showmen, performed a lively set, clever in how they urged the audience to snap and clap along.

In the end, it is their playing that really counts, and the band’s musicianship is solid. What Vent D’Ouest offers is far from the standard wedding schtick, managing to bring in a strong jazz vibe from the clarinet and weaving snippets of popular tunes, like the Mission: Impossible theme, into more standard melodies. I doubt anyone else is playing a mix of “Hava Nagila” and “Bamboleo” (which, given klezmer’s links to the Balkans, is not so far-fetched as it might sound at first). Continue reading

Share