The Snowy Day to Knuffle Bunny: Caldecott Winners to Enjoy with Your Kids

I’ve always been a reader. Some of my life’s crazy historical obsessions started with a children’s one-volume encyclopedia I received as a gift when I was ten, and today I probably own 2,000 books. To me books are the best possible means for “walking in someone else’s shoes.” As book buyer for Audrey’s Museum Store, I’m glad to see some of our visitors go home with books like The Snowy Day, pictured above (with me peeping out from behind!).

I’ve always been a reader. Some of my life’s crazy historical obsessions started with a children’s one-volume encyclopedia I received as a gift when I was ten, and today I probably own 2,000 books. To me books are the best possible means for “walking in someone else’s shoes.” As book buyer for Audrey’s Museum Store, I’m glad to see some of our visitors go home with books like The Snowy Day, pictured above (with me peeping out from behind!).

Summer’s here, which means families with kids across the southland are in summer break mode (even if yours aren’t quite school-age yet). Let your kids travel to new worlds and meet new people between the covers of some first-rate children’s literature! One of the best ways to put together a top-notch book list for the littlest ones in your family is, of course, to ask for recommendations from a librarian. Even better, get recommendations from a whole bunch of librarians by checking out the work of current and past winners of the Caldecott Medal.

The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the American Library Association to the most distinguished illustrated children’s book published that year. The exhibition The Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats—on view at the Skirball through September 7—afforded us the wonderful opportunity to highlight one of the recipients of this special award (The Snowy Day received the medal in 1963).

Here are a few Caldecott honorees we chose to feature in Audrey’s Museum Store along with all of Keats’s in-print books:

noahs ark_skirball_caldecott winner

 

Noah’s Ark, by Peter Spier

With amazingly detailed pictures, Spier tells the Noah story with almost no words.  Perfect for a family who wants to create their own take on this classic story.

 

 

 

 

 

Skirball_fables

 

 

Fables, by Arnold Lobel

Each page spread features an original short fable with a facing illustration of the key story moment. Animal antics poke fun at oh-so-human foibles that even the young ones will recognize.

 

 

 

 

flora flamingo

 

Flora and the Flamingo, by Molly Idle

Pure pictorial pleasure: the tale of Flora and a flamingo and how they learn, as unlikely friends, to dance in perfect harmony.

 

 

 

 

 

 

hello window

 

The Hello, Goodbye Window, by Norton Juster and Chris Raschka

Told in the voice of a little girl, this book captures the magical bond of grandchildren and grandparents. Their house is a special place of discovery and imagination.

 

 

 

 

 

knuffle bunny

 

Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale, by Mo Willems

On the advice of store director Pam Balton’s granddaughter, we offer this inventive picture book, the story of what can go wrong when we can’t find the words to make ourselves understood. Or in Trixie’s case, the frustration of a toddler who knows far more than she can articulate.

Posted in Recommendations, Shopping and tagged , .

About Susan Van De Vyvere

Susan Van De Vyvere has been the Operations Manager of Audrey’s Museum Store for 10 years. Before coming to the Skirball, she ran specialty retail shops at the Autry Museum, the gemological institute and Sony’s Culver City movie lot, as well as a record store and amazing gift shop. She is conducting a lifetime field study of aberrant human shopping behavior (making use of her degree in anthropology from UCLA!) Born and raised in Long Beach, she remembers Southern California before the 405 freeway and when driving to Disneyland (which in kid-time took hours and hours) involved orange trees, and only orange trees, for as far as the eye could see. Inside and outside of work, she reads—a lot.

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