18 Selfies of the Skirball at 18 (Well, If It Could Take a Selfie)

Happy birthday, Skirball! Today you turn eighteen. If you were like other Angelenos your age, you might be spending these days preparing for prom… or waiting for college acceptance letters… or applying for that job you weren’t eligible for until now. Hopefully you’d live up to your mission and register to vote and not dodge jury duty. You’re not quite old enough for a cocktail, but we’ll toast you nonetheless.

It’s been a good year for you, Skirball. At last, your fifteen-acre campus was completed, and in grand style at that. The Jewish Journal took note of the special occasion in a cover story on your founder, Uri D. Herscher, and he and architect Moshe Safdie reflected upon the journey of your building on film. Of this particular birthday, Uri also reminds us, “Eighteen in Jewish life is special cause for celebration, for in Hebrew the number spells life—and the Skirball’s life is thriving like never before.”

Now, as an eighteen-year-old, you would certainly spend a ton of your time taking selfies and posting them online—if only you could. But since you can’t, a few of us on staff took some for you. Here are eighteen gorgeous—and some unexpected—views of you, all taken in the last week or so. Thanks for being home to us and to so many of our visitors. Happy eighteenth!

A graceful curve toward the new Herscher Hall and Guerin Pavilion. Photo by Madeline Tuthill.

A graceful curve toward the new Herscher Hall and Guerin Pavilion. Photo by Madeline Tuthill.

On concrete and Tadoussac stone, the early morning sun signals a new day. Photo by Mia Cariño.

On concrete and Tadoussac stone, the early morning sun signals a new day. Photo by Mia Cariño.

Cypress trees bring a distinctively California Mediterranean vibe to the campus. Photo by Patrice Mineshima.

Cypress trees bring a distinctively California Mediterranean vibe to the campus. Photo by Patrice Mineshima.

A rectangle of light, at the foot of the staircase behind the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Kim Kandel.

A rectangle of light, at the foot of the staircase behind the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Kim Kandel.

Shadows on the second floor colonnade in the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Shadows on the second floor colonnade in the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Paver stones beckon visitors to this contemplative spot off the Taper Courtyard mezzanine. Have you stepped inside? Photo by Candice Crawford.

Paver stones beckon visitors to this contemplative spot off the Taper Courtyard mezzanine. Have you stepped inside? Photo by Candice Crawford.

The dig site on a sunny day, ready for budding archaeologists. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

The dig site on a sunny day, ready for budding archaeologists. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

Lounging on the hidden bench on the terrace. Photo by Sara Kahlenberg.

Lounging on the hidden bench on the terrace. Photo by Sara Kahlenberg.

Find out where you fit in <i>Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America</i>. Photo by Sue Boorujy-Larson.

Find out where you fit in Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America. Photo by Sue Boorujy-Larson.

Discovering one of the secret hiding places aboard Noah's Ark. Photo by Lisa Delgin.

Discovering one of the secret hiding places aboard Noah's Ark. Photo by Lisa Delgin.

Aviator butterflies in Noah's Ark at the Skirball. Photo by Jennifer Caballero.

Aviator butterflies in Noah's Ark at the Skirball. Photo by Jennifer Caballero.

Deer grazing near the rainbow mist arbor. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

Deer grazing near the rainbow mist arbor. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

A giant cricket pays a visit. Photo by Sara Marino.

A giant cricket pays a visit. Photo by Sara Marino.

The changing light on the Kopple Terrace. Photo by Tom Schirtz.

The changing light on the Kopple Terrace. Photo by Tom Schirtz.

A rainbow (or two) always trumps the selfie. Turning the camera to look out across the canyon. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

A rainbow (or two) always trumps the selfie. Turning the camera to look out across the canyon. Photo by Jen Maxcy.

Tere O'Connor Dance performs in the Getty Gallery. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Tere O'Connor Dance performs in the Getty Gallery. Photo by Daniel Soto.

Sunset at the Skirball. Photo by Candice Crawford.

Sunset at the Skirball. Photo by Candice Crawford.

All roads lead to Skirball. Photo by Ernie Mondaca.

All roads lead to Skirball. Photo by Ernie Mondaca.

A graceful curve toward the new Herscher Hall and Guerin Pavilion. Photo by Madeline Tuthill.On concrete and Tadoussac stone, the early morning sun signals a new day. Photo by Mia Cariño.Cypress trees bring a distinctively California Mediterranean vibe to the campus. Photo by Patrice Mineshima.A rectangle of light, at the foot of the staircase behind the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Kim Kandel.Shadows on the second floor colonnade in the Taper Courtyard. Photo by Daniel Soto.Paver stones beckon visitors to this contemplative spot off the Taper Courtyard mezzanine. Have you stepped inside? Photo by Candice Crawford.The dig site on a sunny day, ready for budding archaeologists. Photo by Jen Maxcy.Lounging on the hidden bench on the terrace. Photo by Sara Kahlenberg.Find out where you fit in Visions and Values: Jewish Life from Antiquity to America. Photo by Sue Boorujy-Larson.Discovering one of the secret hiding places aboard Noah's Ark. Photo by Lisa Delgin.Aviator butterflies in Noah's Ark at the Skirball. Photo by Jennifer Caballero.Deer grazing near the rainbow mist arbor. Photo by Jen Maxcy.A giant cricket pays a visit. Photo by Sara Marino.The changing light on the Kopple Terrace. Photo by Tom Schirtz.A rainbow (or two) always trumps the selfie. Turning the camera to look out across the canyon. Photo by Jen Maxcy.Tere O'Connor Dance performs in the Getty Gallery. Photo by Daniel Soto.Sunset at the Skirball. Photo by Candice Crawford.All roads lead to Skirball. Photo by Ernie Mondaca.

Posted in Around Campus and tagged .

About Mia Cariño

Mia Cariño is Vice President, Communications and Marketing, at the Skirball, which generally means she thinks about words, pictures, the stories they convey, the people to whom to tell them, and what it takes to tell them well. Her daughter, Astrid, is named after Astrid Kirchherr, Astrid Lindgren, and Astrud Gilberto: not a bad trio of women. Mia has lived in Manila, New York, Toronto, Manila, Bryn Mawr, and Philadelphia, and has now lived in Los Angeles longer than she's ever lived anywhere. It's home.

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